Gap Makes Apology to China for Shirt That Omitted Taiwan

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China has been ramping-up efforts to police language used to describe Chinese-claimed territories such as Taiwan.

According to the Global Times, a mouthpiece of the Communist Party, a photo posted on Chinese social media and taken at a store in Canada showed that self-governed Taiwan, which China considers to be a renegade province, was omitted from the map on the T-shirts.

Gap immediately responded to the criticism on the site saying it "respects China's sovereignty and territorial integrity" and that it had just learned that one of its T-shirts in some overseas markets failed to reflect the "correct" map of China.

The clothing brand, based in the US, is the most recent worldwide business to be in trouble with the government of China over that country's territorial issues. In the South China Sea, China is engaged in a number of disputes over islands, coral reefs, and lagoons in what is a major commercial thoroughfare that is potentially rich in resources. The map also appeared to leave out southern Tibet and the disputed South China Sea, the state-owned Global Times said, adding that it drew hundreds of complaints on China's Weibo microblogging platform.

Gap Inc has apologised for selling a shirt with an incorrect map of China after photos of the shirt found in an outlet store in Canada made the rounds online.

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A series of other big Western brands have apologized over missteps on Chinese territorial issues.

Other companies have felt compelled to apologize to the massive nation. In January, websites as well as apps for Marriott were blocked for more than week after the hospitality company listed Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan and Tibet as individual countries in both emails as well as apps.

Delta Air Lines, hotel operator Marriott and fashion brand Zara are among businesses that have apologized to China for referring to Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Tibet as countries on websites or promotional material.

What do you think of the Gap's apology, PR Daily readers?

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