Apple is going to stop app developers from harassing you

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Coombs goes on to say that users will always be given the choice between "Never, When in Use and Always" when the app is first used, so you can have your Uber and uh, eat it too.

Lin and Apple watcher John Gruber are asking how Apple let this app past its review process and are demanding Apple reconsider its App Store advertising system.

Analysts say that by making tipping an "in-app purchase", Apple is aiming to make more money out of Chinese users.

At WWDC, Apple reported that they've paid out $70 billion to developers, with 30% of that ($21 billion!) in the previous year.

Developer Johnny Lin drew attention to the app after noticing it had become a top earner despite it coming from a developer without a high reputation.

It has now been removed from the US App Store (but is apparently still accessible in the Belize App Store) but since it was posted on 14 April, it is estimated by Mobile analytics firm Sensor Tower to have made around $80,000 a month. Of course, the rub is that the next prompt includes a Touch ID authentication window which relays that once the 7-day trial period expires, a recurring 7-day subscription to the tune of $99.99 will commence.

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Shady developers are gaming the App Store's policies and its search ads to get users to download apps that trick them into paying for subscriptions for scam apps.

Equally, he asks how Apple don't have a process to flag this app when it starts to generate revenue at the rate that it clearly did.

Gruber argued that Apple needs to reassess "the effects of allowing developers to buy their way to the top spot in search results". Google has spent more than a decade battling people who use spammy methods to game its search engine so some learning curve is to be expected. The app review prompts may seem to be a smaller issue but these are annoying things faced by smartphone and tablet users after every few days.

Cook also told the developers that Apple has reduced the time it takes to approve each app for sale in their store to as little as 24 hours. "One of the problems is that most users don't even know that the top result on their search is a paid ad-they look nearly identical to the actual results". Upon downloading and executing the app, Lin said it requests access, or "cccess" to the user's contacts; the only option provided is to agree.

Aside from changing its developer policies, Apple could do a lot to improve the usability of in-app subscriptions.

From there you can manage everything from payment to your subscriptions. However, he also notes that at the exorbitant prices the app charged, it would only need around 200 subscribers to get to that amount.

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